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Top 3 Things to know about condensation on windowsYou just got out of a nice warm shower. Look at the windows. Do you see that layer of fog and the droplets running down in rivulets? That’s condensation and normally, it’s really not a bad thing. However, when you start to find precipitation when no one has been in the bathroom, it’s time to start worrying. What may not seem like such a small thing can cause problems in areas you can’t see. Damaged paint, mildew in the drywall, and stained wood decorations are just a few of the problems that unwanted moisture can cause.

Here are the top 3 things you need to know about excess condensation in your house.

  1. A good thing is causing a bad problem. You’ve worked hard to make sure that your house is air tight to keep the heat in during the winter and out during the summer. The windows and doors have a good seal around them and you’ve found all of the cracks and holes in the walls that leak the conditioned air that you are paying good money for. Unfortunately, your hermetic house is now holding humidity from daily showers, dishwasher discharge, and slightly clogged dryer vents. Unwanted dampness is now trying to find its way out and can’t; raising the ambient moisture level which leads to…
  2. Higher humidity creating hidden horrors. When condensation can’t dissipate into the surrounding air, it has a tendency to collect in dark damp places and make them worse. Mildew and mold begin to develop in unseen areas and soon spread out along the edge of drywall and wooden joists in the walls. By the time it begins to show through the paint or peek out from floorboards and moldings, it’s a good bet that your walls need more than a coat of Kilz. As an added problem, residual droplets will eventually eat through wood varnish and stain or discolor wooden furniture and trim. Renovation or worse may be necessary. Don’t fret yet, however because…
  3. Controlling condensation is enormously easy. If you start to notice excessive vapor around the house, all you need to do is open a window. By letting fresh, albeit chilly, air circulate for ten minutes a day during the frosty months, you can prevent mold and mildew from taking over the house. Cold winter air is naturally dry and will act as a sponge; drawing out surplus damp and keeping unhealthy spore growth at bay. On the other hand, if the cost of reheating the house is too much, there are mechanical and chemical drying options that will keep your home dry. Search through the net and find one that works for you.

Although excess condensation can cause numerous aesthetic, structural, and health problems, it is a relatively simple situation to remedy. Keep an eye on the windows and you’ll catch it before it becomes a problem. If nothing else, open a window. Fresh air is good for the lungs!

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